History of Alameda

A collection of articles on Alameda History by Dennis Evanosky and Eric J. Kos

 

Alameda Chamber of Commerce postcard of Neptune Beach

 

Good Friday, April 14 

 

Peralta, Sausal, Leona and Arroyo Viejo creeks flow from the Oakland Hills and empty their waters into San Leandro Bay. Native Americans plied the bay’s water and the nearby marsh to reach the nourishment that the birds provided at the rookery on “Wind Whistle Island,” as the Indians called our Bay Farm Island.  

Alameda Naval Air Museum’s (ANAM) motto — “Come see history in your own backyard” — will have special meaning this Saturday, April 1. The museum invites everyone young and old to visit Alameda Point, where they can look to the skies around 11:45 a.m. to witness a B-25 flying over the former Naval Air Station. The historical aircraft is making its appearance to commemorate the 75th anniversary of the departure of the USS Hornet CV-8 from Alameda Naval Air Station on April 1, 1942, to begin the Doolittle Raid.

 

Monday, March 20

  • 7 p.m. Public Utilities Board Meeting. Alameda Municipal Power Service Center, 2000 Grand St.  

Tuesday, March 21

  • 7 p.m. City Council Meeting. Council Chambers, City Hall, 2263 Santa Clara Ave. 

Wednesday, March 22

  • 7 p.m. Transportation Commission Meeting. Council Chambers, City Hall, 2263 Santa Clara Ave.

 

March 31, 1917 dawned a sunny, but frosty day in Alameda. Robert C. Strehlow and his partners August Freese and Pete Peterson weren’t worried though. They knew that the frost would dissipate and the sun would warm the day and attract visitors as the doors opened for the first time at Neptune Beach. The trio had waited for this day. They had gone to considerable expense to convert the long-closed Neptune Gardens to a more modern attraction. 

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