History of Alameda

A collection of articles on Alameda History by Dennis Evanosky and Eric J. Kos

 

Alameda Chamber of Commerce postcard of Neptune Beach

The Alameda Free Library will present a discussion in honor of Black History Month with local historian Rasheed Shabazz on Black Migrations: from Africa to Alameda. Shabazz will discuss 20th-century black migration from Africa to Alameda, and how black people moved within Alameda and were removed from Alameda during the 1990s. 

The discussion has been set for Tuesday, Feb. 12, from 6 to 7:30 p.m. in the Stafford Room at the Main Library, 1550 Oak St. Free admission, no registration required. To find out more, visit www.alamedafree.org.

A recent successful movement changed the name of a school named for a California governor who advocated slavery: Henry Huntly Haight. A letter in this week’s Alameda Sun (“Street names bear investigation”) suggests that researchers (“social justice warriors”) in the letter writer’s words turn to other places in Alameda with the names of personalities involved in slavery. Alameda has a street in the Fernside neighborhood that certainly qualifies for such research: Yale Drive.

 

The USS Hornet Sea, Air and Space Museum, in honor and remembrance of Pearl Harbor, hosted a special panel discussion with four-time Purple Heart recipient Lawson Sakai. Sakai, a member of the historical 442nd Regimental Combat Team, reflected upon his memories of Dec. 7, 1941. The event occured on the USS Hornet on Dec. 7. 

Civil War veteran lived on Bay Farm Island near road that bears his name

George Anderson was among the second wave of settlers, many of them Portuguese, who began settling on Bay Farm Island in the 1870s. Other men who came to farm the rich soil with their families included: Adrian Hamlin, J.E. Ellis, Daniel Swett, John Titlow and Thomas Jose Miranda. 

Alameda pioneer Benajah Benedict lived on Bay Farm Island — where he cultivated crops — for almost 50 years. He invested some of his profits in real estate. He had three homes built on Jackson Street — including one currently on the market. According to Alameda Museum Curator George Gunn, records do not reflect the names of the architects or builders for these Queen Anne-style, high-basement homes. Gunn writes that the home at 2853 Jackson St. was known to be standing in 1888 and that Benedict had the home at 2857 built in 1895; and the home currently on the market at 2855, in 1896. 

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