History of Alameda

A collection of articles on Alameda History by Dennis Evanosky and Eric J. Kos

 

Alameda Chamber of Commerce postcard of Neptune Beach
William Gardiner Transportation Collection     This building stood at Atlantic Avenue and Webster Street. It served first as a carbarn and stables for Theodor Meetz’ horse-car lines and later as a power station when the lines were converted to electic-powered streetcars, like the one pictured.

Horse-Drawn Streetcars Once Plied Our Streets

Apr 14,2021

Part one in a series

Mid-19th-century Alamedans did not have a convenient way to travel to Oakland. This was especially true for West Enders who had to travel — oftentimes walk— across the peninsula to catch J. P. Potter’s omnibus that ran from Park Street to Oakland.

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These illustrations, perhaps appropriate and stylish for the time, accompanied an article and advertisements in the Encinal. The depictions of policemen in the image at left may have meant to discourage drunken revelers and “roughs” known to frequent Alameda’s bayside resorts and multiple drinking establishments.

Alameda Celebrates Rebirth as ‘Island City’

Apr 08,2021

On an auspicious date in Alameda history often overlooked, Aug. 8, 1902, at 7:30 a.m., the Alameda peninsula was detached from the mainland after decades of engineering work. “The city attained to insular importance ...

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With sideburns like those, you’ve got to believe Dr. A. W. K. Newton’s claims on 19th-century miracle cures.

Side Effects May Include Universal Satisfaction

Mar 18,2021

Lately I’ve come across social media postings from people who are surprised at just how many pharmaceutical advertisements Americans are subjected to on a daily basis, and how Americans can rattle off the names of such fabulous products as Skyrizi, Ozempic and Trempfya.

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