History of Alameda

A collection of articles on Alameda History by Dennis Evanosky and Eric J. Kos

 

Alameda Chamber of Commerce postcard of Neptune Beach

Alameda pioneer Benajah Benedict lived on Bay Farm Island — where he cultivated crops — for almost 50 years. He invested some of his profits in real estate. He had three homes built on Jackson Street — including one currently on the market. According to Alameda Museum Curator George Gunn, records do not reflect the names of the architects or builders for these Queen Anne-style, high-basement homes. Gunn writes that the home at 2853 Jackson St. was known to be standing in 1888 and that Benedict had the home at 2857 built in 1895; and the home currently on the market at 2855, in 1896. 

With less than a week before the onset of the Jewish New Year, the question of where to attend services is high on the list for many Jewish families and singles. Recognizing the often high price tag attached to the experience, Chabad of Alameda is offering its friendly and welcoming services for free for individuals of all ages in the Alameda Jewish community.

The Alameda Island Poets July reading will feature Connie Post, Livermore Poet Laureate emeritus, and Carole Dwinell, Wednesday, July 11, at 7 p.m. The event is hosted by Nanette Deetz with an open mic following. Admission is free. Donations appreciated. Light refreshments will be served. 

A new type of history presentation titled “For Your Eyes Only: Two Ways of Seeing,” will feature two local experts discussing what they notice in vintage Alameda images. Woody Minor, author of A Home in Alameda and many other books and newspaper stories about Island culture, buildings and history and Grant Ute, author of Alameda by Rail, transit historian and photo archivist at the Western Railway Museum will host. The presenters will show how foreground and background switch, depending on personal interests and knowledge about content cues and context.

 

The movement to rename Haight Elementary School after someone less racist appears to be growing. The next suggestion is that our city’s first park named for President Andrew “Indian Killer” Jackson needs a new name.

To put the renaming and statue pulling movement in some context here in Alameda, we’d like to remind local residents of the following:

Pages