History of Alameda

A collection of articles on Alameda History by Dennis Evanosky and Eric J. Kos

 

Alameda Chamber of Commerce postcard of Neptune Beach

The Alameda Island Poets July reading will feature Connie Post, Livermore Poet Laureate emeritus, and Carole Dwinell, Wednesday, July 11, at 7 p.m. The event is hosted by Nanette Deetz with an open mic following. Admission is free. Donations appreciated. Light refreshments will be served. 

A new type of history presentation titled “For Your Eyes Only: Two Ways of Seeing,” will feature two local experts discussing what they notice in vintage Alameda images. Woody Minor, author of A Home in Alameda and many other books and newspaper stories about Island culture, buildings and history and Grant Ute, author of Alameda by Rail, transit historian and photo archivist at the Western Railway Museum will host. The presenters will show how foreground and background switch, depending on personal interests and knowledge about content cues and context.

 

The movement to rename Haight Elementary School after someone less racist appears to be growing. The next suggestion is that our city’s first park named for President Andrew “Indian Killer” Jackson needs a new name.

To put the renaming and statue pulling movement in some context here in Alameda, we’d like to remind local residents of the following:

Alameda Island Poets’ monthly free reading Wednesday, Feb. 7, from 7 to 9 p.m., will celebrate Black History Month with local poets Amos White and Wanda Sabir. 

White is an award-winning American haiku poet, author, producer, director and activist, recognized for his vivid literary imagery and breathless poetic interpretations. He has been published in several national and international reviews and anthologies. 

Once called the West End School and attended by famed author Jack London, today’s Longfellow School took its current name on Aug. 12, 1895.

The date coincided with the dedication of a magnificent new school building (right) at Pacific Avenue and Fifth Street. The leading local newspaper of the time, the Encinal, described the building as “a credit to the intelligence of our people” and “securing plenty of light and air.” 

The building was replaced with more modern facilities in 1942 that are still in use today as part of Alameda’s public school district.

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