Feature Articles

Oregon Historical Society. In 1867 Carleton Watkins took this photograph of a train coming around what the locals called "Cape Horn" on the portage route between The Dalles and Celilo Falls on the Columbia River. The train belonged to the Oregon Steam Navigation Company.

City hall recognizes tireless efforts of once vice-mayor, perennial volunteer 

The city of Alameda teamed up with the Arnerich family to surprise the family patriarch, Lil Arnerich, at the July 1 City Council meeting. His children, grandchildren and great grandchildren turned out to witness Mayor Marie Gilmore read a proclamation that declared the week of June 29 to July 5 “Lil Arnerich Week.” Lil’s wife, Norma, expressed her delight that she was able to get Lil to the council chambers without his knowing about the proclamation. She stood by his side at the dais as Gilmore read the city’s decree.

Robert R. Thompson moved to Alameda with his family in 1877. A steamboat captain, Thompson found wealth navigating the Columbia River. 

Before plying the Columbia,  Thompson had cashed in on the California gold rush. Now he intended to do the same in Oregon by mining a new breed of gold miners on their way north. 

Native Americans made Europeans aware of gold on the Fraser River in 1857. Word spread beyond this British Columbia outpost, setting off a gold rush and raising demand for travel on the Columbia River. 

Currently, fundamentalism gets a very bad rap. It is difficult to acknowledge it in less than a pejorative light. 

The sight of professional tennis players clad in pink, a barbecue to the side, a raffle and participants with smiles all around marked the success of the first Rally for the Cure at the Harbor Bay Club. 

University of California, Davis, graduate and professional tennis player Chris Aria organized this fundraiser on Saturday, May 31, with the support of the nonprofit Susan G. Komen Foundation.  

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